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News and Anouncements from the Center for Remote Sensing

18 Apr. 2004 - The Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder Project announces a new Current Icebergs web page tracking the current position of large Antarctic icebergs.

30 Mar. 2003 - The Winter 2003 Edition of the CERS Observer The most recent edition of the BYU Center for Remote Sensing's news letter, CERS Observer, is available for download in viewing in Adobe PDF format.

July 3, 2002 - The CERS Site has received a nice overhaul to make it look like the SCP and MERS sites. Report any broken links to long@ee.byu.edu

30Mar. 2003: The Winter 2003 Edition of the CERS Observer The most recent edition of the BYU Center for Remote Sensing's news letter, CERS Observer, is now available for download in viewing in Adobe PDF format.

1May. 2002: The Winter 2002 Edition of the CERS Observer, the BYU Center for Remote Sensing's news letter, CERS Observer, is now available for download in viewing in Adobe PDF format.

5 Mar. 2002: Third Annual NASA E-Theater

On the 5th of March 2002 the BYU Center for Remote Sensing is sponsoring its third annual presentation of NASA E-theater: A new and updated a NASA presentation entitled "Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land & oceans: Electronic-Theater 2002". Two capacity crowd presentations in the Varsity Theater were given on in the evening for the general public.

Jan. 2002: National Geographic Magazine

The latest issue of National Geographic includes an insert map of Antarctica based on radar. The land image is the high resolution RADARSAT image collected over a month in 1997 during the RADARSAT Antartic Mapping Mission (RAMP). To show sea ice, the map includes a one-day (year 2000) QuikSCAT high resolution sea ice image from the Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder website http://www.scp.byu.edu/ produced at BYU. The attribution list includes BYU and BYU's Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder Project. An extensive number of large icebergs are visible in the image.

Oct. 2001: Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder

The BYU Center for Remote Sensing announces the availability of scatterometer-based climate record data from the Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder. A description of this NASA-sponsored project and its data is available for download and view in Adobe PDF format.

The Fall 2001 Edition of the CERS Observer

The most recent edition of the BYU Center for Remote Sensing's newz letter, CERS Observer, is now available for download in viewing in Adobe PDF format.

1 Jan. 2001: Second Annual NASA E-Theater

On the 10th of January 2001 the BYU Center for Remote Sensing is sponsoring a new and updated a NASA presentation entitled "Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land & oceans: Electronic-Theater 2001". This is our second annual presentation. Last year the turn out was so large that we have scheduled two showings. One will be 7 to 8 pm and the other will be 9 to 10 p.m. Both will be at the Joseph Smith Building Auditorim on the Brigham Young University Campus. For more information, you can view a color flyer. The presentation will be made by Dr. Fritz Hasler and Hal Pierce of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

The Fall 2000 Edition of the CERS Observer

The most recent edition of the BYU Center for Remote Sensing's newz letter, CERS Observer, is now available for download in viewing in Adobe PDF format.

July 2000: BYU Presents a record number of papers at IGARSS

A total of 28 presentations and papers were presented at IGARSS'2000 this year. Out of these papers, 23 had student co-authors.

20 January 2000: Iceberg B10A Breakup

B10A (a iceberg found with QuikScat in the summer of 1999 in the Drake Passage shipping lanes) broke up just west of South Georgia Island last week. A22B, an equally large iceberg is nearby. Currently, BYU is supplying the location of these icebergs with the aid of the near-real-time processing to the National Ice who is issuing mariner's alerts. An image (4MB gif) shows a time sequence of enhanced resolution scatterometer observations of B10A's break up on JD11, 2000 near South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic. A22B is nearby. The image consists of 6 rows of images with time running to the right. For each day there are two images, one morning and one evening. The top row images were created from Seawinds 13.5 GHz V-pol 'eggs' using the SIR resolution enhancement algorithm. The pixel resolution is ~2.225 km. The second row was created from Seawinds 13.5 GHz H-pol 'eggs'. The last rows were created from 'slices' measurements using the SIRF resolution enhancement algorithm while the center rows were done with the AVE algorithm. Note that the intrinsic resolution of the SeaWinds sensor is approximately 7x25 km but is improved with the algorithms. Since the algorithms tend to have artifacts over the ocean, seeing all the versions can be helpful for interpretting the images. The ocean appears dark when the wind speed is low and lightens for higher wind speeds which accounts for the lightening and darkening of the images. Generally, glacial ice shows up brightly against the ocean, but can be hid when the wind speed is high. The images show that on JD9 B10A is in one piece but that by JD12 it is clearly in multiple pieces.

27 January 2000: Electronic Theater 2000

On the 27th of January 2000 at the BYU Center for Remote Sensing is sponsored a NASA presentation entitled "Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land & oceans: Electronic-Theater 2000". The turn out was so large that two showings were presented with an estimated 2000 people view the presentation. Our thanks to Dr. Fritz Hasler and Hal Pierce of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for their effors. It was an program to remember! We hope to have them back again next year. For more information, you can view the color flyer used for advertising the presentation.

27 January 2000: Official Center Startup

On the 27th of January 2000 the BYU Center for Remote Sensing was formally announced by Dr. Gary Hooper, of the Academic Vice President's office. He announced that the Center Director would be Professor David G. Long of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. The Associate Director will be Dr. Perry Hardin of the Geography Department. Here is the full story.